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A large part of my work is dealing with Conflict, Bullying and Harassment in the Workplace.

I’m really excited to launch 3 blogs on this subject titled:

  1. Non-Judgement within Conflict
  2. Courage in Conflict
  3. Managing Emotions in Conflict

If you are experiencing conflict in your workplace that has it resulted in:

  • Loss of Productivity
  • Low Morale
  • Poor Teamwork
  • Poor communications and relationships
  • High Absenteeism
  • High Turnover
  • Lack of Creativity and Problem Solving
  • Low levels of Engagement or
  • Lack of brand loyalty

I hope to address some of these issues within these blogs.

Courage within Conflict

I’m sure like me you have experienced people demonstrating great courage during conflict and confrontation.

Courage to turn up every day even though there may be a huge underlying issue

Courage to stand by their convictions

Courage to fight for better conditions or a better solution to a persistent problem

However, sometimes this courage can falter and the results of consistently turning up without support can manifest in physical, mental and emotional distress which can have a devastating impact on people, teams and business performance and results.

It’s important to have the courage to reach out for help before things get this bad so today I’m going to share 3 strategies to help you build your courage muscle at work.

  1. Find a support person and talk to them. As the old saying goes, ‘A problem shared is a problem halved’. Talking out what is going on with another person can be great to help you process what’s going on and to gain some clarity. This could be a friend, co-worker or family member. Alternatively, you can seek professional support and guidance.
  2. Document what’s Happening. Write it down and keep a diary of events so you can clearly identify the root cause of the conflict and the impact it’s having on you and/or your team or business. It can be helpful to do this under the following headings;
  • What is happening
  • Where is it happening
  • Who is present
  • The impact of the issue, situation or behaviour on yourself an others
  • What would resolve this for you
  • If it was your friend in this situation, what would you advise them to do

It’s well known that writing things down and getting them out of your head is a great first step to reducing the magnitude and overwhelm of a situation and for helping you prepare a strategy for dealing with it and finding a satisfactory solution.

  1. Seize your Courage: After you have spoken to a support person and written everything down, the next step is to seize your courage and face the person you need to speak to about the issue or situation. You can do this on your own or bring a support person with you. A support person could be a co-worker, a manager or a HR representative or you could request a friend or family member be present.

When you have spoken to a support person and written everything down, you will be more prepared to have the Difficult Conversation and you will be clear on what you want to say.

The more you do this the more you will cultivate your courage muscle.

I will be speaking more about this in my three Complementary Video Tutorials which I’m launching on May 1st.   If you are interested in getting these into your inbox you can go to my website www.HRwithHarte.com.  On the website home page, you can subscribe to the blog and you will automatically be registered for the free training videos.

If you would like immediate assistance with resolving conflict in your workplace you can contact me at:

Email: jan@hrwithharte.com

Or Tel: (087) 2388250

 

 

 

 

 

 

A large part of my work is dealing with Conflict, Bullying and Harassment in the Workplace.

 

I’m really excited to launch 3 blogs on this subject titled:

  1. Non-Judgement within Conflict
  2. Courage in Conflict
  3. Managing Emotions in Conflict

 

If you are experiencing conflict in your workplace that has it resulted in:

  • Loss of Productivity
  • Low Morale
  • Poor Teamwork
  • Poor communications and relationships
  • High Absenteeism
  • High Turnover
  • Lack of Creativity and Problem Solving
  • Low levels of Engagement or
  • Lack of brand loyalty

I hope to address some of these issues within these blogs.

 

Courage within Conflict

I’m sure like me you have experienced people demonstrating great courage during conflict and confrontation.

Courage to turn up every day even though there may be a huge underlying issue

Courage to stand by their convictions

Courage to fight for better conditions or a better solution to a persistent problem

However, sometimes this courage can falter and the results of consistently turning up without support can manifest in physical, mental and emotional distress which can have a devastating impact on people, teams and business performance and results.

It’s important to have the courage to reach out for help before things get this bad so today I’m going to share 3 strategies to help you build your courage muscle at work.

  1. Find a support person and talk to them. As the old saying goes, ‘A problem shared is a problem halved’. Talking out what is going on with another person can be great to help you process what’s going on and to gain some clarity. This could be a friend, co-worker or family member. Alternatively, you can seek professional support and guidance.

 

  1. Document what’s Happening. Write it down and keep a diary of events so you can clearly identify the root cause of the conflict and the impact it’s having on you and/or your team or business. It can be helpful to do this under the following headings;
  • What is happening
  • Where is it happening
  • Who is present
  • The impact of the issue, situation or behaviour on yourself an others
  • What would resolve this for you
  • If it was your friend in this situation, what would you advise them to do

It’s well known that writing things down and getting them out of your head is a great first step to reducing the magnitude and overwhelm of a situation and for helping you prepare a strategy for dealing with it and finding a satisfactory solution.

  1. Seize your Courage: After you have spoken to a support person and written everything down, the next step is to seize your courage and face the person you need to speak to about the issue or situation. You can do this on your own or bring a support person with you. A support person could be a co-worker, a manager or a HR representative or you could request a friend or family member be present.

When you have spoken to a support person and written everything down, you will be more prepared to have the Difficult Conversation and you will be clear on what you want to say.

The more you do this the more you will cultivate your courage muscle.

 

I will be speaking more about this in my three Complementary Video Tutorials which I’m launching on May 1st.   If you are interested in getting these into your inbox you can go to my website www.HRwithHarte.com.  On the website home page, you can subscribe to the blog and you will automatically be registered for the free training videos.

 

If you would like immediate assistance with resolving conflict in your workplace you can contact me at:

Email: jan@hrwithharte.com

Or Tel: (087) 2388250